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contemporary Chinese art

Some Place Else

Sacramento Temporary Contemporary,  January 2010

 

"Some Place Else" was a group exhibition of several Chinese artists (Yu Hang, Yang Yongliang, Hang Bin, Zhang Wei, and Zhang Xianyong)  who explored the realm of a dream state despite the harsh realities of a new China's economic, cultural and political shifts. With the successful 2008 Olympic Games behind, China achieved the unachievable. China raced against time to prove to the world that it too is a modern country. But the transformation had its price. These artists living in Beijing and Shanghai presented work that hinted at what has been left behind: a landscape, a city and a society in turmoil. This was the first introduction of contemporary Chinese art in Sacramento.

Some Place Else

LIMN gallery,   San Francisco   September 2009

 

 “Some Place Else” was a group exhibition of four Chinese photographers, Zhang Xianyong, Yu Hang, Han Bing & Yang Yongliang who explore the realm of a dream state despite the harsh realities of a new China’s economic, cultural and political shifts. All four photographers work and live in Beijing and Shanghai.

Landscape in Transit
LIMN gallery,   San Francisco    April  2009   

 

With the 2008 Olympics as a deadline, China achieved the unachievable. China raced against time to prove to the world that it too, is a modern country. But the transformation had its price. Three artists living in China - Han Bing, Yang Yongliang and Zhang Wei present work that hints at what has been left behind: a landscape, a city, and a society in turmoil.

 
Yang Yongliang

LIMN gallery, San Francisco    September 2008

 

Yang Yongliang is a young artist from Shanghai who studied traditional Chinese art such as shui mo painting and calligraphy from his early age. Yang Yongliang cleverly chose to recreate "Cun", the main representation of Chinese Shanshui paintings by using a camera, the contemporary visual device to express his creativity for the subjects he is concerned with. He combined the traditional Chinese paintings with the modern Shanghai city life and the details reveal current urban culture. The scenes of construction sites have been arranged to fit into the traditional Chinese paintings' composition. 

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China Avant Garde, II
Arena 1 gallery,   Santa Monica    January 2008   
The Gao Brothers' photographs direct our gaze onto the most rapidand profound urbanization and globalization in the history of China. Enormously influenced by the Cultural Revolution (their father was shot during its height after being accused of “bourgeois and intellectual tendencies”) The Gao Brothers’ work is provocative, poignant, poetic and often overtly political. Their photographs have on and off been subjected to censorship for over 15 years. Particularly troublesome to the Chinese authorities is the recurring Mao portrait that has become a cornerstone of their work. MISS MAO, a fiberglass sculpture representing a stylized Mao bust with a Pinocchio nose, which is part of this exhibition, is the latest addition to this growing body of work.